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The Signal

The 10 Physical Skills Every Man Should MasterThe 10 Physical Skills Every Man Should Master

The Art of Manliness  |  Brett & Kate McKay

Now that you’re a grown man, you probably don’t think all that much about the different ways you can move your body (unless it’s to note how much more painful some of them feel these days). After all, you’ve been doing such thoroughly simple things like running and jumping for decades now, and they feel completely instinctual. You don’t have to think much about basic physical movements anymore.ce.

That’s the common line of thinking, at least. But it’s a wrong-headed and detrimental perspective.

That which we believe is “basic” turns out to have layers of complexity we simply haven’t discovered yet.

And while we don’t typically think about them as such, physical movements are skills, and like all skills, they need to be deliberately, regularly, and continually practiced and challenged in order to stay in fighting shape and truly be mastered.

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Are You a Self-Interrupter?Are You a Self-Interrupter?

Nautilus  |  Adam Gazzaley & Larry D. Rosen

Our technology-rich world has proven to be both a blessing and a curse. While on the one hand we have access to information or people anywhere at any time, on the other hand we find our attention constantly drawn by the rich, multisensory, technological environments. It all started with the graphical user interface that took us from the flat, two-dimensional text-based environment that operated on a line-by-line basis similar to a typewriter, to a small picture depicting an operation or program. From there it was a short hop to a completely multisensory world appealing to all of our visual, auditory, and tactile or kinesthetic senses.

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What I Learned from a Year of Intermittent FastingWhat I Learned from a Year of Intermittent Fasting

Outside  |  Kyle Boelte

For several years during my early thirties, I was constantly tired. Starting around 2012, I was going for a five-mile run about three times a week, lifting weights just as often, and usually getting a good night’s sleep. I wasn’t training for the Olympics or running ultras, and I didn’t have a newborn keeping me up at night. I also wasn’t out of shape, overweight, or unhealthy. Yet every afternoon I felt the need to lie down for a nap—and if I didn’t, I was often irritable. I struggled to explain the problem to my wife and friends. I was fit and healthy. This was the prime of my life. Shouldn’t I feel great?

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How To Be More Productive By Working LessHow To Be More Productive By Working Less

Mark Manson

It took me 18 months to write The Subtle Art of Not Giving A Fuck. Over that time period, I wrote somewhere in the vicinity of 150,000 words for the book (about 600 pages). Most of that came in the final three months. In fact, I can confidently say I got far more done in the final three months than I did in the first 12 combined.

Now, is that because I was on a deadline and worked like an insane person? Did I shove Adderall up my ass and work in 36-hour spurts or something?

No, in fact, those last three months, I worked less each day than I did the first 12, yet I still accomplished far more.

In this article, I’d like to make a simple argument (backed with lots of shitty images I created in MS Paint): that when it comes to productivity, things are not what they seem.

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The Red Hook Crit

Done after dark, on a uniquely challenging course along the cobblestone streets of its namesake Brooklyn neighborhood, The Redhook Crit held it’s 10th annual race day. The first bike race was for a few dozen fixed-geared riders to celebrate founder David Trimble’s 26th birthday, but today it’s a high-octane charge around Red Hook by some of the best racers in the game. Six years ago the organizers added a 5K run as a warm up to the main biking event, but that too has become an almost gladiatorial spectacle of the world’s best run clubs, from Black Roses NYC to the West Side Runners and more. Both the run and the bike race are famously competitive, with huge, cheerleading crowds only adding to the atmosphere.

Red Hook Crit

We got together a bunch of our fastest buddies and created Decem Milia Run Club, to compete in this year's 5k running race. After watching the bike qualifying, the team took a warm up run around the parking lot and did some pre-race stretching. This was the first race for a lot of the crew, so the excitement was matched with a lot of nervous laughter.

Red Hook Crit

Under the watchful eye of Lady Liberty, the 10th annual Red Hook Crit 5K race kicked off just before sunset. Race teams came from across the globe and included big names like the West Side Runners, the Henwood Hounds, New York Athletic Club. Over the next four laps, the sense of excited camaraderie quickly turned into stubborn determination and on to utter exhaustion.

    Red Hook Crit

    Between the hundreds of runners, the packed crowds, and tight turns, the Red Hook Crit 5K is an unusually technical race and you had to know where to turn on the jets and where to shave off speed. Slowing down into the corners uses an amazing amount of energy compared to running straight through a marathon and even the most experienced runners had to adapt.

    "The RHC is such a unique race. It's unlike anything I've been part of in all the racing I've done. Having it all in a small location creates an amazing energy and the perfect location to see what you've got to give on that day. We couldn't have asked for a better inaugural race for Decem Milia. The only question now is can we all PR this thing next year?!" 

    -Kieth Nowak, CEO, Ten Thousand

    Red Hook Crit

    From a starting group of 316, Decem Milia member Skyler Mosenthal placed 24th at 16 minutes 43 seconds, followed by three other teammates in the top 150 runners. The relief of finishing and shock at the difficulty and technical skill required for a 5K was etched on all of the runners’ faces. Most of the Decem Milia crew are used to crushing it in triathlons and ultra marathons, so struggling through a 5K was a sobering moment.

    Red Hook Crit

    Decem Milia brought to you by Bespoke Physical Therapy, Endurance Squad, Rove, Swerve, Hard Boiled Holistics, WellWell, Seamore’s, and Street Soccer USA— a big shoutout to our rockstar sponsors who made it happen.

    Boost Your Workouts With Caffeine, Even if You Chug Coffee Daily

    The New York Times  |  Gretchen Reynolds

    Caffeine improves athletic performance. This is a truth almost universally acknowledged in exercise science.

    But scientists, coaches and athletes also have thought that to gain any performance boost from taking caffeine before an event, an athlete had to abstain from the stuff for days or weeks before a big event.

    A new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology intimates, however, that these ideas about caffeine and performance are out of date and that someone can swill coffee every day and still get a caffeine performance buzz when needed.

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    How to Maintain, Or Even Improve, Your Memory As You Age

    The Washington Post

    As you age, some slowdown in memory and processing is to be expected. That can mean a forgotten birthday, an accidentally retold story, a temporarily misplaced wallet.

    Such run-of-the-mill forgetfulness may increase over the years but is usually not — as you may fear — a sign that you’re on the road to a condition that can seriously impair memory and thinking, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

    Still, small thinking slip-ups are inconvenient and can sometimes be early warning signs of a more significant problem. So it’s natural to want to take mind- and memory-protective steps.

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    How to Live on 24 Hours a Day: Arnold Bennett on Living a Meaningful Life Within the Constraints of Time

    Farnam Street Blog

    Despite having been published in 1910, Arnold Bennett’s book How to Live on 24 Hours a Day remains a valuable resource on living a meaningful life within the constraints of time. In the book, Bennett addresses one of our oldest questions: how can we make the best use of our lives? How can we make the best use of our time?

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    The Gospel of Hard Work, According to Silicon Valley

    Wired  |  Nitasha Tiku

    Silicon Valley's emphasis on work-life balance may be evolving, but its priesthood still values a very particular kind of grit. This ideological tension came to blows earlier this week in a marathon Twitter fight that started on Memorial Day, with anecdotal evidence and closing arguments still trickling in days later.

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    Darwin Was a Slacker and You Should Be TooDarwin Was a Slacker and You Should Be Too

    Nautilus  |  Alex Soojung-Kim Pang

    When you examine the lives of history’s most creative figures, you are immediately confronted with a paradox: They organize their lives around their work, but not their days.

    Figures as different as Charles Dickens, Henri Poincaré, and Ingmar Bergman, working in disparate fields in different times, all shared a passion for their work, a terrific ambition to succeed, and an almost superhuman capacity to focus. Yet when you look closely at their daily lives, they only spent a few hours a day doing what we would recognize as their most important work. The rest of the time, they were hiking mountains, taking naps, going on walks with friends, or just sitting and thinking. Their creativity and productivity, in other words, were not the result of endless hours of toil. Their towering creative achievements result from modest “working” hours.

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    The New Rules of Hydration

    The New Rules of Hydration

    Outside  |  AC Shilton

    Robert Sallis has seen it all. As a medical director for the Ironman World Championships in Kona, Hawaii, he’s spent 20 years watching athletes in every manner of distress get wheeled into the medical tent. He’s seen hyponatremia, or overhydration, a handful of times. He’s seen hundreds, maybe thousands, of dehydration cases. Sallis has even seen athletes show symptoms of both at the same time: they’ve dropped weight over the course of the race, signaling dehydration, but their blood sodium levels are dangerously low, a sign of hyponatremia.

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    To Be a Genius, Think Like a 94-Year-OldTo Be a Genius, Think Like a 94-Year-Old

    The New York Times  |  Gretchen Reynolds

    In 1946, a 23-year-old Army veteran named John Goodenough headed to the University of Chicago with a dream of studying physics. When he arrived, a professor warned him that he was already too old to succeed in the field.

    Recently, Dr. Goodenough recounted that story for me and then laughed uproariously. He ignored the professor’s advice and today, at 94, has just set the tech industry abuzz with his blazing creativity. He and his team at the University of Texas at Austin filed a patent application on a new kind of battery that, if it works as promised, would be so cheap, lightweight and safe that it would revolutionize electric cars and kill off petroleum-fueled vehicles. His announcement has caused a stir, in part, because Dr. Goodenough has done it before. In 1980, at age 57, he coinvented the lithium-ion battery that shrank power into a tiny package.

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    New Research Indicates Cycling To Work Has Extraordinary Health Benefits

    New Research Indicates Cycling To Work Has Extraordinary Health Benefits

    Forbes  |  Kevin Murnane

    It should come as a surprise to no one that physical activity and exercise is good for you. What may come as a surprise to many is just how good it can be. Research reported in the British Medical Journal last week indicates that cycling to work has extraordinary health benefits.

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    Getting Ripped vs. Getting StrongGetting Ripped vs. Getting Strong

    The Art of Manliness  |  Brett McKay

    I’m going to lay some hard truth on you here: Despite what the internet or that dude-bro at the gym might say, you cannot get both super lean and super strong at the same time. They are goals that are diametrically opposed to each other.

    Now, don’t misunderstand me. I’m not saying you can’t be shredded and strong. There are lots of men out there who have 10% body fat and can deadlift and squat a ton.

    You just can’t work on getting ripped and strong at the same time.

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    Seneca on The Shortness of Time

    Seneca on The Shortness of Time

    Farnam Street

    If we see someone throwing money away, we call that person crazy. This bothers us, in part, because money has value. Wasting it seems nuts. And yet we see others—and ourselves—throw away something far more valuable everyday: Time.

    Unlike the predictable reaction we have to someone throwing away money (they're crazy), we fail to think of the person who wastes time as crazy. And yet time is a truly finite, expendable resource: The amount we get is uncertain, but surely limited. It's even more insane to waste than money — we can't make any more when it runs out!

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    Does Yoga Qualify as an Aerobic Workout?Does Yoga Qualify as an Aerobic Workout?

    The New York Times  |  Gretchen Reynolds

    Yoga offers some obvious benefits: stress reduction, muscular flexibility, an enhanced sense of well-being, even cute clothes. But does it qualify as an aerobic workout?

    Aerobic activity, characterized by an elevated heart rate and increase in the body’s use of oxygen, is closely linked to improved health and prolonged life spans; current guidelines suggest that people get at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise each week.

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    What Makes Something Popular?

    What Makes Something Popular?

    WBUR  |  Jeremy Hobson with Derek Thompson

    Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Derek Thompson (@DKThomp), senior editor of The Atlantic and author of "Hit Makers: The Science of Popularity in an Age of Distraction," about what makes something — from a book to a product or a political slogan — catch on and become popular.

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    The Outwork MythThe Outwork Myth

    Jason Fried

    Assuming you can put in more hours than someone, or work harder than someone else, is giving yourself too much credit for your effort and not enough for theirs.

    Hours are never the differentiator — it’s never about working more hours than someone else. It’s about the decisions you make. How you spend your time, what you do and don’t do. Especially what you don’t do.

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    The School of Greatness

    The School of Greatness

    Lewis Howes

    Lewis Howes is a NYT bestselling author, lifestyle entrepreneur, former pro athlete and world record holder in football. The goal of the School of Greatness is to share inspiring stories from the most brilliant business minds, world class athletes and influential celebrities on the planet; to help you find out what makes great people great.

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    3 Questions You Need To Answer Before You’ll Have The Life You Want3 Questions You Need To Answer Before You’ll Have The Life You Want

    Thought Catalog  |  Ryan Holiday

    In building my company and in working and advising many other companies and people over the years, I’ve found that three important decisions, made early, can eliminate so much of that anguish. They can set you up to not only be successful, but put you in a position to enjoy that success. These three choices have changed my business life. But they have fulfilled what I think are the two main criteria for anyone making choices about how to run their life and work: 1) They made me money. 2) They made me happier.

    Hopefully they’ll be of some service to you too.

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    Ultimate Hawaiian Trail Run Competition

    Ultimate Hawaiian Trail Run Competition

    Kauai, Hawaii

    The Ultimate Hawaiian Trail Run Foundation is proud to say that 100% of our efforts go to support our inclusive fitness program that is free for all kids. The program’s heart centers around more than just fitness-- we aim to cultivate an environment that will challenge, empower, and dare the kids to thrive. We provide a community that is accessible for these kids on a daily basis, available year-round, that they can learn skills that extend well beyond the boundaries of the gym. With the support of the Ultimate Hawaiian Trail run every kid, from keikis through high school, can be a part of our mighty ohana.

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    Urban Life CrossFit

    Urban Life CrossFit

    Syracuse, New York

    Urban Life opened in 2013 with a team that shared a passion for fitness, had a vision to cultivate a tight-knit community, and a commitment to help others live an active lifestyle. We’ve since grown into a multi-studio fitness facility. Our CrossFit gym boasts knowledgeable instructors; group camaraderie; and constantly varied, insanely fun workouts that yield results.

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    How To Adjust Sets And Reps To Fit Your Training GoalHow To Adjust Sets And Reps To Fit Your Training Goal

    Breaking Strength  |  Dresdin Archibald

    The number of warm-up sets done on the way to work-set territory can vary. Many beginners make the mistake of taking too narrow a step between each set. By the time they get to their work sets, they are showing signs of fatigue and cannot perform at their best. Excess warm up can be a sign of lack of confidence. This is especially seen to be true in competition settings where stress is high and those extra sets pile up quickly.

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    5 DEADLY KINDS OF EGO THAT PREY UPON YOUR SUCCESS

    5 Deadly Kinds of Ego That Prey Upon Your Success

    Ryan Holiday

    When success arrives, ego begins to toy with our minds and weaken what made us win in the first place. This is the worst thing that can happen, because things get harder as we become more successful. In sports, the schedule gets harder after a winning season, the bad teams get better draft picks, and the salary cap makes it tough to keep a team together. Taxes go up the more you make.

    If you want to survive those new challenges, you must learn to fight these five manifestations of ego.

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    How Being Bored Out of Your Mind Makes You More CreativeHow Being Bored Out of Your Mind Makes You More Creative

    Wired  |  Clive Thompson

    Unless it turns out ennui is good for us. What if boredom is a meaningful experience—one that propels us to states of deeper thoughtfulness or creativity?

    That’s the conclusion of two fascinating recent studies. In one, researchers asked a group of subjects to do something boring, like copying out numbers from a phone book, and then take tests of creative thinking, such as devising uses for a pair of cups. The result? Bored subjects came up with more ideas than a nonbored control group, and their ideas were often more creative. In a second study, subjects who took an “associative thought” word test came up with more answers when they’d been forced to watch a dull screensaver.

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    Whitney’s Everything Energy Bars

    Whitney’s Everything Energy Bars

    Outside  |  Whitney Spivey

    I used to live in Columbia, Missouri, where I frequented the Saturday morning farmers’ market. I’d usually show up after a long run, which meant I was hungry. Really hungry. And I discovered there was nothing more satisfying after pounding the pavement for a dozen-plus miles than a huge (I’m actually embarrassed to admit how huge) helping of watermelon, followed soon thereafter by a granola bar from local Uprise Bakery. These $2.50 chunks of goodness were an amazing blend of peanut butter, chocolate chips, oats, honey, cranberries, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds and a few other ingredients that I could never seem to recreate in my own kitchen... Until recently.

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    Don’t Set Goals for Yourself—Instead, Create Systems That Make it Easy For You to Succeed

    Quartz  |  Khe Hy

    So I set about creating a system, using the project management app Trello, that would give me a bigger, birds-eye view of how I live my life. To design it, I broke it into four sections: Two focused on big-picture issues, and two that dealt with concrete changes. The basic idea was that with a system that was actionable, yet not overwhelming, I could generate a lot of “small wins” on a daily basis—providing momentum for much bigger projects.

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    8½ Books: The Top 10 Cycling Books of 2016

    SB Nation: Podium Cafe  |  Feargal McKay

    Time to look back at the year that was on the Podium Café Bookshelf and work out the Top 10 of 2016's cycling books. The following are in an order and not in an order, both at the same time: the two books at the top of the list could exchange places depending on my mood, the book at the bottom is meant to be at the bottom, the rest float freely.

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    Sciatica And Hip Pain: Deal With It

    Breaking Muscle  |  Bethany Eanes

    The hip is a major contributor to all core work. In fact, when we first learn to sit up as babies, we rely on our hip muscles rather than the muscles of our trunk to do this. Repetitive motion like cycling, running and squatting can irritate the muscles in and around the pelvis, leading to chronic pain or limitation. Sciatica and piriformis syndrome are two conditions often presenting with similar symptoms. Here is a guide to the difference between the two as well as treatment for each.

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    The Dark History of The Treadmill

    BBC

    It's one of the most popular and best-selling pieces of exercise equipment available, adored by gym-goers the world over for its convenience and safety. Yet the treadmill has a surprisingly disturbing past. You see, before the invention of the modern consumer version, it was associated with a very different kind of exercise...

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    The Wrong Eating Habits Can Hurt Your Brain, Not Just Your WaistlineThe Wrong Eating Habits Can Hurt Your Brain, Not Just Your Waistline

    NPR  |  Alan Yu

    A diet high in saturated fats and sugars, the so-called Western diet, actually affects the parts of the brain that are important to memory and make people more likely to crave the unhealthful food, says psychologist Terry Davidson, director of the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience at American University in Washington, D.C.

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    Why Your New Year's Resolution Will Fail

    Why Your New Year's Resolution Will Fail

    Breaking Muscle  |  Riley Holland

    You can always add to your list of New Year's goals once you have momentum. But the attitude should be that once you say you'll do something, come hell or high water, you're going to do it. So make few promises, but keep them all. That's how you accumulate real power.

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    19 Ingenious Design Books to Inspire You in 2017

    19 Ingenious Design Books to Inspire You in 2017

    Wired  |  Margaret Rhodes

    The best design books have the power to spark new thoughts, theories, ideas, and opinions. Collected below is a diverse collection of 19 such books, published in the past year. Here you’ll find everything from black-and-white photos of Brutalist buildings, to heady essays on graphic design’s role in society, to pretty doodles. Whatever your interests, there’s something here to fascinate and inspire you in 2017.

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    How to Meditate

    How to Meditate

    The New York Times  |  David Gelles

    Mindfulness meditation isn’t about letting your thoughts wander. But it isn’t about trying to empty your mind, either. Instead, the practice involves paying close attention to the present moment — especially our own thoughts, emotions and sensations — whatever it is that’s happening.

    In addition to basic meditation instructions, we’ve compiled guided meditations for a few popular exercises including the body scan, walking meditation and mindful eating. “Each of the applied mindfulness practices brings alive an experience that might otherwise be more automatic,” said Ms. Brach.

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    3 Important Life Skills Nobody Ever Taught You3 Important Life Skills Nobody Ever Taught You

    Mark Manson

    An unfortunate side effect of our consciousness residing in our brains is that everything we experience in our lives involves us somehow. The car in traffic today cut you off. The cable news show you saw last night pissed you off. Your company’s massive growth this year gave you more money.

    As a result, we tend to have an inherent bias towards assuming that pretty much everything that happens to us is actually about us.

    But here’s a newsflash: Just because you experience something, just because something causes you to feel a certain way, just because you care about something, doesn’t mean it’s about you.

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    Your Recovery Obsession Is Slowing You Down

    Your Recovery Obsession Is Slowing You Down

    Outside  |  Erin Beresini

    Recovery is not needed after every session and we should always think about what the athlete is recovering from as well as what their next session is,” says writes Shona Halson, the Australian Institute of Sport’s Head of Recovery. “Some fatigue and soreness is obviously okay at certain times in the training program, but when competition or high quality training sessions are required, an increased focus on recovery is needed.

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    The Best Books of 2016

    The Best Books of 2016

    Farnam Street Blog

    On Twitter in late November we asked Farnam Street readers What Was The Best Book You Read in 2016?

    Turns out you are all a well read bunch: almost 90 books came up in the discussion and many of them brand new to us.

    Below are the most frequently mentioned books on the list, followed by a few dozen other non-fiction and fiction titles you recommended (in alphabetical order by author), with a focus on books that should be new to many readers and well worth exploring.

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    Carbs During Workouts May Fend Off Colds

    Carbs During Workouts May Fend Off Colds

    The New York Times  |  Gretchen Reynolds

    Until recently, many scientists believed that exercise reduces the body’s ability to fight off infections. Past studies had found, for example, that after workouts, especially strenuous ones, people had fewer infection-fighting white blood cells in their bloodstreams than before working out, suggesting that their immune response had been weakened.

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    A Short List of Books for Doing New ThingsA Short List of Books for Doing New Things

    Farnam Street  |  Andrew Ng

    Ng thinks innovation and creativity can be learned — that they are pattern-recognition and combinatorial creativity exercises which can be performed by an intelligent and devoted practitioner with the right approach. He also encourages the creation of new things; new businesses, new technologies. And on that topic, Ng has a few book recommendations. Given his list of accomplishments, the quality of his mind, and his admitted devotion to reading the printed word, it seems worth our time to check out the list.

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    Training Tips from the World's Greatest Athlete

    Training Tips from the World's Greatest Athlete

    Outside

    What change in your approach to training has had the biggest impact on your success?

    Just taking an overall professional approach. My coach Harry Marra has instilled that into our training process. Everything we do has a reason and a purpose, everything is well thought out. We always remain flexible in our approach, but we don’t ever do anything haphazardly. We always have a reason for what we do in training.

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    “Work at things that are central to your life”: The argument for never retiring

    “Work at things that are central to your life”: The argument for never retiring

    Quartz  |  Anne Quito

    In the US, a traditional career is designed as a marathon, with the finish line at age 65. After a 40-year grind, we’re expected to stop working and revel in a life of idle, stress-free days funded by hard-earned pension plans.

    But not everyone wants to stop: For the few who’ve found a way to blur that proverbial work-life dichotomy, retirement is more dead end than welcome repose.

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    ‘How Much Suffering Can You Take?’

    ‘How Much Suffering Can You Take?’

    The New York Times  |  Randal C. Archibold

    After 500 miles on a bike, 10 in the water and more than 100 on foot, it will make perfect sense to grab a branch and a broomstick in a desperate bid to propel yourself — like a giant mutant insect — the last 31 miles. It will not be enough. You will collapse on the road.

    Seasick, miles into the swim, you will vomit. Twice.

    Neck cramps will attack so fiercely on the bike that your head will slump. You will go cross-eyed and nearly crash.

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    Ten Thousand started with one goal: to create the highest quality training gear without compromise. The journey over our first 12 months has taught us a tremendous number of lessons and surpassed even our most ambitious expectations. We’ve been overwhelmed by the positive response from our customers, partners, growing communities, and ever-expanding team. We’ve also, at times, been literally overwhelmed with keeping up with the pace of orders. Because you all have been so supportive and patient during our first year, we felt we owe an explanation about why we’ve had stockouts and what we’re doing to fix it.

    At our launch last October, three months worth of products sold out in the first two weeks. We were stoked but also caught off guard. So we doubled the size our next production run which sold out even faster. And while being too in demand is one of the best problems going, we know from chatting with many of you that the gaps in inventory have been as frustrating for you as they have been for us. For that, we sincerely apologize. We couldn’t be more grateful for your support and want to reassure you that we’ve made some big changes to make it right.

    So, what gives? Building anything from the ground up takes a lot time and the design, prototyping, testing, and production of high-quality training gear is a marathon process. We spent over a year testing hundreds of fabrics and meeting with the best mill partners in the world before deciding on our custom fabrics. We’re proud of these unique textiles, and are confident that they are the best performing in the industry, but there’s no rushing the lead time on custom designed fabrics and we simply couldn’t restock fast enough to meet rising demand.

    In year two, we’re ready: we’re incorporating even better fabrics from more agile partners in France, Italy, and Japan; we’re keeping more fabrics and trims on hand so we can reduce lead times; we’re doubling our production capacity by bringing on an additional manufacturing partner in the USA; and we’re going big, with a current production run that’s larger than all previous ones combined. Plus, we’re psyched to welcome our new Head of Design from Rapha, a brand we’ve long admired for their flawless design and constant attention to detail.

    With the next evolution of our gear, we’re taking an entirely new approach to developing training essentials so you can create the kit that exactly suits how you train and how you prefer your gear to fit and perform. The newest stuff will be hitting the site in the next month and we can’t wait to show you what we’ve been working on. We hope that you'll bear with us in the meantime, sign up for product waitlists to be notified the moment products are available again, and continue to support Ten Thousand. We cannot thank you enough for everything so far.


    — Keith Nowak, Co-founder & CEO

    The 75-Year-Old Arm Wrestler

    The 75-Year-Old Arm Wrestler

    New York Times  |  Adam Glanzman

    Norm’s been at it for 25 years and is still dominating the world of arm-wresting. He’s an awesome, and unexpected, example of perseverance and putting in countless hours of work for nothing but love of the sport.

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    Alistair Brownlee helping brother Jonny finish his triathlon sacrificing his chance of winning.

    Alistair Brownlee Helping Brother Jonny Finish His Triathlon Sacrificing His Chance of Winning

    YouTube

    Not really much more to say about this one. An absolute must see. 

    Watch Now

     

     

    8 HEALTHY HABITS THAT ARE CHEAPER THAN YOUR MORNING LATTE

    8 Healthy Habits That Are Cheaper Than Your Morning Latte

    The Chalkboard

    I really like this article since it hits on all the health tips I share with friends, related to food and otherwise. Some may seem pretty obvious but it's amazing the effect they can have on your everyday if you get into the habit of practicing them regularly. 

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    Finding Ultra

    Finding Ultra

    Finding Ultra  |  Rich Roll

     Rich's approach to fitness, diet and lifestyle has really resonated with me. It's helped convert me to being "plant-powered" and has stoked my drive for endurance sports. I initially read Finding Ultra some years ago but still dial up on Audible every summer when I start logging 100+ mile rides. His podcast (The Rich Roll Podcast) is also fantastic. For the unacquainted, his recent interview with Charlie Engle is a good entry point.

    Read More

    Inside The Unique Mind of the World's Best Solo Climber

    The Strange Brain of the World’s Greatest Solo Climber

    Nautilus  |  J.B. Mackinnon

    Honnold is history’s greatest ever climber in the free solo style, meaning he ascends without a rope or protective equipment of any kind. Above about 50 feet, any fall would likely be lethal, which means that, on epic days of soloing, he might spend 12 or more hours in the Death Zone. On the hardest parts of some climbing routes, his fingers will have no more contact with the rock than most people have with the touchscreens of their phones, while his toes press down on edges as thin as sticks of gum. Just watching a video of Honnold climbing will trigger some degree of vertigo, heart palpitations, or nausea in most people, and that’s if they can watch them at all. Even Honnold has said that his palms sweat when he watches himself on film.

    Read More

     

     

    This happiness hack from a wildly popular Stanford class can help you create a life you love

    This Happiness Hack From A Wildly Popular Stanford Class Can Help You Create A Life You Love

    Quartz  |  Bill Burnett and Dave Evans

    To get started, we recommend thinking about the last time that you were on cloud 9—an experience that gave you a glimpse of adrenaline-induced ecstasy, if only for a moment. It could be the feeling you had when you got a great new job offer, fell in love, finished a marathon or traveled to a beautiful country. This kind of memory is called a peak experience. Examining it can help you to look at events in the future, designing a more fulfilling life in the process.

    Read More

     

     

    First Impressions: Apple Watch Series 2

    First Impressions: Apple Watch Series 2

    Outside  |  Michael Frank

    For fitness, Apple built a basic but mercifully easy-to-use native app, called Workout, to track gym workouts, runs, bike rides, and more. It tracks all that activity with a built-in gyroscopic, accelerometer, and LED heart rate monitor. These sensors remain the same in the Watch Series 2. The Watch collates and presents workout data, plus your standing and all-day movement stats, in its accompanying app, Activity.
    To calibrate speed, Series 1 relies on your iPhone’s GPS. Series 2, on the other hand, uses its built-in GPS. (More on that functionality in a bit.) I should note that all Apple Watches can also learn your stride length so you don’t need a phone to get a close estimation of distance. This is nice because even a GPS watch won’t know how far you’ve gone if you’re, say, running on a treadmill. I’ve found this feature to be quite accurate: the first Watch I tested, in 2015, on a three-mile track run, was off by only 20 feet.

    Read More

     

     

    Phys Ed: Does Music Make You Exercise Harder?

    Phys Ed: Does Music Make You Exercise Harder?

    The New York Times  |  Gretchen Reynolds

    The interplay of exercise and music is fascinating and not fully understood, perhaps in part because, as a science, it edges into multiple disciplines, from physiology to biomechanics to neurology. No one doubts that people respond to music during exercise. Just look at the legions of iPod-toting exercisers on running paths and in gyms. The outcry when USA Track and Field banned headphones in 2007 at sanctioned races like marathons was loud and pained (and the edict was widely ignored until it was revised last year). The neurologist and author Oliver Sacks has talked about personally experiencing the elemental power of music after he injured his leg mountain climbing and had to push himself slowly down the slope with his elbows. He told an interviewer: “Then I found the Volga Boatmen song going through my mind. I would make a big heave and a ho on each beat in the song. In this way, it seemed to me that I was being ‘music-ed’ down the mountain.”

    Read More

    This week’s Digest is all about technology and its impact not only on our training, but the broader world. In hardware, shrinking computers can now fit just about any sensor you can imagine into a bike, allowing riders to adjust to real-time conditions and eke out every advantage over the competition, no matter how small. Turning to apps, we examine how to harness social media and social fitness apps to keep us motivated and hold us accountable in our training. As a bonus, we’ll also see how data from social fitness apps like Strava are even helping cities make smarter infrastructure investments. Finally, taking step back to look at the bigger picture, we’ll consider how, despite amazing progress over the past fifty years, we’re still only in the first phase of Artificial Intelligence.

    Bike Rumor

    Argon18 Develops Jet Fighter Tech To Keep Drag In Check

    Bike Rumor

    Since the advent of carbon fiber technology road bikes have started to look more and more like fighter jets. Now, with the use of sophisticated integrated computer systems, they’re finally starting to perform like them.

    Read More




    Breaking Muscle

    Social Media and the Climate of Fitness

    Breaking Muscle

    It’s easy to make fun of #fitspo and roll your eyes at gym selfies. But training is as much psychological as it is physical, and a solid support network—even a virtual one—can be the difference between success and failure. By drawing lessons from the science of behavior change, we can shape our social media use to support, instead of hinder, our training goals.

    Read More




    The New Yorker

    Th Hype—And Hope—Of Artificial Intelligence

    The New Yorker

    What we thought of as artificial intelligence 50 years ago is now, for most part, already a reality. What we think of as artificial intelligence now may well be, in 50 years, basic computing. Amidst these dizzying changes, Om Malik sets out to cut through the hype and uncover the hope.

    Read More




    Curbed

    How A Fitness App For Cyclists Is Reshaping City Planning

    Curbed
    Bicycle commuting is on the rise across the nation. As more cyclists take to the road to get to work, cities are trying to find ways to keep everyone safe and are turning to an app called Strava to do so. Using complex heat maps to discover riding and routing tendencies, municipal governments are discovering ideal locations for new bike lanes.

    This week's Digest focuses on turning points. Whether it’s a distance running prodigy who turned to strength training, or a landmark study showing how a few critical points can influence the rest of our lives, each of these articles explore how we discover, analyze and ultimately act on critical turning points in training and in life.

    - Need to Try -

    That’s Not Fat: How Ryan Hall Gained 40 Pounds of Muscle

    Runner's World
    Ryan Hall’s showing at the 2011 Boston Marathon, finishing with a time of 2:04:58, made him the fastest American-Born marathoner of all time. Tuning your body to cover so much ground in so little time can undoubtedly take its toll. After suffering constant injuries and fatigue, the marathon prodigy announced his retirement from competitive running this past January. Since then he’s made some huge changes to the way he trains and in doing so says he’s never felt better. 

    Read More

     
     - Need to Ponder - 
    WHAT MAKES A GOOD LIFE: REVELATORY LEARNINGS FROM HARVARD'S 75-YEAR STUDY OF HUMAN HAPPINESS

    What Makes a Good Life: Revelatory Learnings from Harvard’s 75-Year Study of Human Happiness

    Brain Pickings
    An age-old question, perhaps THE age-old question: How can we be happier? Turns out, some bright folks at Harvard University have us covered. For the past 75 years they’ve been studying a group of 724 men from Boston, tracking and checking-in on a bi-yearly basis. Everything thing from relationship status, to income to medical records have been tracked and analyzed. The outcome? Not exactly what you’d expect.

    Read More

     
    - Need to Know - 
    DON'T LET THE FITNESS INDUSTRY TELL YOU WHAT TO DO

    Don't Let the Fitness Industry Tell You What to Do

    Breaking Muscle
    As athletes we’ve all seen pitches for quicker recoveries, bigger reps, faster laps and leaner gains. We’ve become inundated by an entire industry telling us what to do, what to take and what to eat. As it turns out, there’s no ‘silver bullet’ when it comes to fitness. Focusing on the basics and mastering them may not be the most fashionable training regimen out there but it may not be the worst either. Either way, take our word and give this article a read, or don’t.

    Read More

     
     - Need to Read - 
    The Running Novelist, Learning How to Go the Distance

    Learning How to Go the Distance

    The New Yorker
    Haruki Murakami has become a household name due to the success of his novels such as Norwegian Wood, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle and 1Q84. He’s sold millions of copies of these books and more since he started up his writing career in 1979. This article, written by himself, dives into the exact moment he decided to make a critical change in his life and begin crafting his first novel. It’s no coincidence that this change also lead him directly to another passion in life, long distance running. 

    Read More

    3,931. That’s what we accomplished. 3,931 push-ups completed in 2 hours. That’s 33 push-ups a minute, which translates to $3,931 going to the One Love Foundation to help educate, empower and activate young people in their communities in a movement to end relationship violence. 3,931 examples of pure effort harnessed for a great cause.

     We had 12 winners coming from our 4 divisions. The men’s division winner completed 76 push-ups while the women’s winner completed 44 push-ups. In our trainer divisions our men’s winner completed 84 push-ups while our women’s winner completed 49.

    Check out the complete round-up below. 

    Men's Division

    1. 76 Push-ups
    2. 74 Push-ups
    3. 72 Push-ups

    Women's Division

    1. 44 Push-ups
    2. 43 Push-ups
    3. 32 Push-ups

    Men's Equinox Trainer/Staff Division

    1. 84 Push-ups
    2. 74 Push-ups
    3. 72 Push-ups

    Women's Equinox Trainer/Staff Division

    1. 49 Push-ups
    2. 47 Push-ups
    3. 40 Push-ups

    We wanted to say Thank You to everyone that came out and made this event what it was. The energy that we all created last night was inspiring. For more images of the event check out our facebook gallery

    Thank You!

    - The Ten Thousand Team

    Bring your A-game and come join us as we kick-off our new partnership with a bang. We're hosting a Push-Up Challenge at the Greenwich Equinox location on Tuesday, August 16th from 6-8pm. We'll be scoring the most correct form push-ups completed in a minute for a chance to win some awesome prizes and, more importantly the supreme bragging rights of being a push-up champion. No need to suit up, casual attire is fine. 

    We've also teamed up with the One Love Foundation, and will be donating $1 for each push-up completed on the night. They're an awesome organization that works tirelessly to educate, empower and activate young people in their communities in a movement to end relationship violence.

    Pro tip: Learn from one of the very best in the business, our buddy and coach at SSD, Adam Scott. His article, You’re Doing Your Push-Ups Wrong,  goes through some of the most common mistakes made when hammering out push-ups.

    Hope to see you next Tuesday. Please feel free to bring friends.

    This week we’re excited to announce a new partnership with Equinox. As you know, these guys are the premier fitness club in the country and share our values and vision on training. Our gear will now be available across the country in their top 9 clubs and we’re working closely with their top tier trainers in the design, development, and testing of our next products. 


    If you’re a member of Equinox or live near one, stop in to try on some gear and stock up. You can check out the store finder on our site for the exact locations where our gear is being carried. If you’re in the New York area come celebrate the launch with us! As one naturally would, we’re kicking off our partnership with a  push-up contest which will take place at the Greenwich Equinox on August 16th at 6pm. Check out our post below on proper push-up form to get ready. We’ll be sharing more details soon.


    Nothing is more important to us than learning from you and other athletes about how our products actually translate into athletic performance. The desire to continuously evolve and improve is an essential part of what we believe makes our gear special. Through our Field Test program, we’ve begun tapping into the needs, wants and problems of top-tier Equinox trainers and their clients to help us dial in our next round of new gear. We could not be more psyched about being able to collaborate with some of the best in the business. 


    Thank you for all the support. We’re thrilled to have you as part of the team as we continue to improve our gear and work with partners like Equinox push us to new levels.

    Words By: Meaghen Brown
    Images By: Rob Shaul

    Our friends over at SSD design comprehensive training programs for military, first responders and mountain athletes. They're at the forefront of creating some of the most unique and targeted training regimes out there, so rest assured, they know how to do a basic push-up.

    ____________________

    According to Mountain Athlete strength and conditioning coach Adam Scott, a perfect push-up can challenge even the fittest athletes when done correctly, but can also be rendered completely useless when done wrong. And a lot of people do them wrong.

    These are three most common mistakes Scott and his colleagues see, and their comprehensive guide to correcting them.

    Mistake #1: Not Maintaining Correct Body AlignmentMistake #1: Not Maintaining Correct Body Alignment

    If you have a weak core, you’re going to have trouble maintaining proper body alignment during a push-up. This will either cause you to drop your hips to the floor, or you’ll overcompensate by pressing your weight back and diving your hips into the air is if you were pressing into a downward dog. Either way, you’ve broken your biomechanical chain which connects your upper and lower body. And trust us, the worms and headbobs you’ll be performing to execute the up-and-down motion of a pushup look more like bad dance moves than exercise.

    Mistake #1: Not Maintaining Correct Body Alignment (The Fix)

    The correction: A correct push-up requires that you maintain rigid alignment from your heels to your hips and all the way to your shoulders—you should be able to draw a straight line from your ankle to the top of your head. “To teach this, isometric core training like simple plank exercises, is the best place to start,” says Scott. Once you can maintain proper alignment in a static position, then you can add small movements like lifting your hand of the ground, before moving on to a full push-up.

    Mistake #2: Shrugged Shoulders and Wide ElbowMistake #2: Shrugged Shoulders and Wide Elbows

    Many novice athletes place their hands way outside their shoulders and try to initiate movement with wide pushing motion. “They are convinced that a wider hand position will give them more strength and stability,” says Scott, “but this position actually does the opposite – wide hands and bowed elbows force you to shrug your shoulders and contort your elbows.” It’s a weaker variation and can also cause shoulder pain over time.

    Mistake #2: Shrugged Shoulders and Wide Elbows (The Fix)

    The correction: When performing a standard push-up you want to align the webbing of your thumbs with your shoulders. As you lower your body, sweep your elbows to your sides. “We watch closely for any shrugging of shoulders and instruct our athletes to keep as much distance between their ears and their shoulders as possible,” explains Scott. “You may not be able to perform as many push-ups in this alignment, but overtime you’ll be able to transfer much more strength through this motion.”

    Note: There is such a thing as a “wide push-up” variation, but this is best attempted after you have mastered a standard push-up.

    Mistake #3: Not Moving Through the Full Range of MotionMistake #3: Not Moving Through the Full Range of Motion

    “Cheaters gonna cheat,” says Scott, “and when it comes to push-ups there are two kinds of cheaters—bottom-half and top-half.” According to Scott, if you’re a “top-half cheater” you’re usually weaker and don’t have the strength to recover after reaching the bottom portion of a repetition.  Instead you stay high in the movement—typically between an arm angle of 180 degrees and 135 degrees. If you’re a “bottom-half cheater,” you’re likely strong enough to do a quality push-up, but you’re probably not as strong as you think. For this reason, you end up bouncing between 90 degrees and 135 degrees. “Unfortunately for you,” says Scott, “100 half push-ups equals 0 push-ups.”

    Mistake #3: Not Moving Through the Full Range of Motion (The Fix)

    The correction: Always train in the full range of motion. This builds muscle memory and strength throughout the entire movement. “For push-ups this means arms fully extended in the up-position and either chest to the ground or shoulders below your elbows at the bottom-position (depending on the standard),” says Scott. “If you can’t quite complete the full range of motion, try going to your knees or elevate your hands until you have found a light enough position. Another, more advanced option, is to try hand release push-ups. Rest your chest on the ground and release your hands at the bottom of each repetition.

    In issue #5 of The Digest we look at the relationship between mind and body. We’ve selected 4 articles that explore the depths and possibilities of this relationship. We all know that a healthy body is only achievable with a healthy mind, but how can we optimize the way we think about physical training to maximize results? Check out the articles below for some solid answers.

    - Need to Read -

    How Did Colin O’Brady Shatter an Absolutely Insane Endurance and Adventure Record?

    How Did Colin O'Brady Shatter an Absolutely Insane Endurance and Adventure Record?

    Outside Online

    Colin O’Brady climbed each of the highest peaks on all 7 continents and trekked to the north and south poles all in 139 days. Brady’s got some tales tell, surprisingly, he explains how this undertaking was just as much a mental challenge as it was a physical one. Here’s how he did it.

    Read More

     

     - Need to Do - 

    Master One Thing

    The Scientific Argument For Mastering One Thing At A Time

    James Clear

    Want to master a new skill? Been looking to impose a long-standing change in your life? Trying to hit that personal goal? Some people naturally find this challenge easier than others. James Clear explores specific techniques that can aid us in becoming more proficient. Focus, focus, focus.

    Read More

     

    - Need to Know - 

    http://breakingmuscle.com/sports-psychology/transform-your-mindset-to-transform-your-body

    Transform Your Mindset To Transform Your Body

    Breaking Muscle

    We all get hurt, we all have physical weaknesses. We must accept this and tune our minds and bodies accordingly. A positive mindset is a crucial asset to keeping your body performing at a high level, learn how to harness it. You’ll be happy you did. 

    Read More

     

     - Need to Ponder - 

    http://nautil.us/issue/38/noise/this-is-your-brain-on-silence-rp

    This Is Your Brain On Silence

    Nautilus

    Science says that a truly quiet place can offer both physical and mental health advantages. In a world that keeps getting louder and louder, countries like Finland are starting to look at silence as a natural resource. This article by Daniel A. Gross begs the question, what is the true value of silence?

    Read More

     

    - Need to Do -

    The Science of Sore – DOMS explained - Strength Theory

    The Science of Sore – DOMS explained

    Strength Theory

    We’re fairly confident that you’ve experienced DOMS before. Hell, you may be experiencing DOMS right now. You know that feeling you get after a huge day in the gym, when it hurts just to get out of bed in the morning? That’s DOMS. It may help to learn a little more about why you hurt so that you’ll be less likely to suffer in the future.

    Read More

     

     - Need to Ponder - 

    Ego is the Enemy: The Legend of Genghis Khan - Farnam Street Blog

    Ego is the Enemy: The Legend of Genghis Khan

    Farnam Street Blog

    Newsflash: Ryan Holiday’s got a new book, and it’s brilliant. In this excerpt, Holiday looks at valuable life lessons that can be learned from the infamous Mongolian marauder, Ghengis Khan. Besides being one of the most successful and violent commanders in modern history, it turns out he was also one of the most humble leaders of all time.

    Read More

     

    - Need to Wear - 

    The Best GPS Running Watch - The Sweet Home

    The Best GPS Running Watch

    The Sweethome

    In the market for a new watch? Do you run, train and burn calories like its your job? It may be time to add a GPS watch to your locker. The fitness gadget market is fairly saturated, and everyone’s got here own preferences but here’s one of the most comprehensive head-to-heads from that we could find.

    Read More

     

     - Need to Do - 

    How Olympians Choose Which Sports Supplements Are Worth It - Wired

    How Olympians Choose Which Sports Supplements Are Worth It

    Wired

    In the ‘sketchy’ world of performance supplements, actual results are hard to come by. Sometimes athletes are just pushing the next hot product with a marketing budget, but there are some sincere adopters for these physical boosters. However, most of the time the science doesn’t lie. So why do most of the world’s best athletes turn to them in their search for glory?

    Read More

     

    - Need to Know -

    The 5K, Not The Marathon, Is The Ideal Race

     The 5K, Not The Marathon is the Ideal Race

    FiveThirtyEight

    When you look at training for a timed run you may be able to save yourself time, money and injuries all while increasing your overall fitness level by trading marathons for the ever present 5k. The signs suggest that the good ole’ ‘fun run’ has finally come of age.

    Read More

     

     - Need to Ponder - 

    The Future of Self - Mark Manson

    The Future of Self

    Mark Manson

    Do you have 15 minutes? If you answered ‘Yes’ to this question then you should be reading this article by Mark Manson. ‘The Matrix’ meets ‘Gattaca’ in Manson’s look into the future of Us and how we’ll be interacting with technology in our lifetimes.  Seriously, go read it, like now.

    Read More

     

    - Need to See -

    Are You a Design Minimalist or Maximalist? - GQ

    Are You a Design Minimalist or Maximalist?

    GQ

    Yves Saint Laurent or Patrick Bateman? In a time where pretty much anything goes in terms of interior design, what do your style choices say about you?

    Read More

     

     - Need to Do - 

    Increasing Fitness in the Other 162 Hours - Breaking Muscle

    Increasing Fitness in the Other 162 Hours

    Breaking Muscle

    Let’s be completely honest, you probably don’t train as much as you’d like to. As a hard working athlete, with a family, job and social life it’s just something we all have to come to terms with. There’s a lot of value in finding ways to eek out marginal gains in everyday activity, here are some good places to start.

    Read More

    Mind over matter. It's all in your head. Just suck it up. Whatever the form, we all intuitively know that training and sports are about pushing yourself mentally much more than physically. In How Bad Do You Want It?, Matt Fitzgerald looks at some of the best endurance athletes in the world—from Greg LeMond to Steve Prefontaine—to prove that what truly matters is what's going on in your head, not in your muscles.

    Hard physical limits definitely do exist, but we never get there. We all quit way before that as we hit the maximum level of perceived effort we're willing to tolerate. In this pursuit of chasing down how bad you want something, you unlock your ultimate physical potential and what really makes you tick as a person. 

    To approach your sport as an ongoing fire walk, aiming to move closer and closer to the unreachable wall that represents your ultimate physical limit, is to embark on a journey of transformation in which you become more and more the athlete—and the person—you want to be as you tackle the obstacles that hinder your progress.

    —Matt Fitzgerald 

    “The mind is the next frontier for significant performance gains . . . . Mental fitness, says Fitzgerald, means becoming your own sports psychologist and developing coping mechanisms to help you suffer better. Which, while not entirely satisfying, is a good start.”

    ―Outside magazine

    How Bad Do You Want It?

    Get It Here

     

     - Need to Read -

    The Ancient Philosophy Taking Over the NFL

    The Ancient Philosophy Taking Over the NFL

    Sports Illustrated

    Stoicism is the distinction between what you can control and what you can’t. That’s probably the hardest idea of pro sports.

    Read More

     

     - Need to Know - 

    Why We Feel Better When We Run

    Why We Feel Better When We Run

    Science of Us

    A good run can sometimes make you feel like a brand-new person. And, in a way, that feeling may be literally true.

    Read More

     

    - Need to Do -

    HOW TO BE HAPPIER, BASED ON SCIENCE

    How To Be Happier, Based on Science

    TIME

    Neuroscientists study that gray blob in your head all day and have learned a lot about what truly will make you happy.

    Read More

     

     - Need to Ponder -

    Why Do We Work So Hard?

    Why do we work so hard?

    1843 Magazine

    A powerful meditation of how and why work becomes our lives if we’re no careful.

    Read More